Contributed Tech Stuff - Bearings

Contributed by F. Robert Falbo


Disclaimer: Information and ideas contained in this section are solely those of the contributor(s) and not those of Harley-Davidson®, Harley-Davidson® of Uica, H.O.G.®, or the Erie Canal H.O.G.® Chapter.



Bearings - Ugh! Let my Mechanic deal with it! I used to think that way. Who wants to get all dirty removing the wheel, then yanking out the old bearings and pressing new ones in. I mean, what if I do it wrong? What if they won't come out? What if I break something? What if the new ones won't fit? What if I bought the wrong size or wrong type?... Arrrrggghhh!!!

Time to chill out! For one thing, starting in 2008, Harley pretty much standardized their wheel bearings, and it comes down to two sizes. Each wheel requires two (2) bearings. If your bike doesn't have Antilock Breaking (ABS), both will be the same "standard" bearing. If your bike has ABS, you'll need one "standard" bearing, and one "encoder" bearing for each wheel.

The two bearing sizes are as follows:

Encoder bearing on the top
Standard bearing on the bottom.
You can see the added
thickness of the encoder bearing.
The ridge goes towards
the inside of the hub.
This is a typical bearing install kit.
You'll only need 1/2 these parts!













As previously mentioned, if you have a bike that doesn't have ABS, then both bearings are the same, and it doesn't matter which side faces out. However, if your bike does have ABS, the thicker encoder bearing gets installed with the grooved side facing in, and the encoder side facing out. (The gold side of the bearings in the pictures) I'm not going to bore you to death explaining the technique of removing and installing the bearings because you can find good videos of the whole process on YouTube.

How can you tell you need new bearings? Well, usually your bearings will tell you they need replacing - hopefully before they cause an accident. I've found that one way to tell is to listen when you enter and exit cloverleafs - entrance & exit ramps. Bad bearings will sometimes sing to you while you're in those tight turns. They also might produce a rumble you can feel - though your tires might also produce that. You can also check the wheels for wobble or looseness while up on a bike lift. If you have your bike on a lift, rotate the wheels by hand and listen and feel for the smoothness of rotation. The wheel should glide during rotation with even pressure against your hand.


MANUFACTURER PART NUMBER 1st BEARING 2nd BEARING RACE MATERIAL BALL MATERIAL PRICE COMMENTS
HARLEY-DAVIDSON 9276B NON-ABS STEEL STEEL $18.99 ea. ONE STANDARD BEARING
HARLEY-DAVIDSON 9252A ABS ENC. STEEL STEEL $27.49 ea. ONE ABS BEARING
DRAG SPECIALTIES 0215-0225 NON-ABS NON-ABS STEEL STEEL $12.95 pr. ONE SET FOR NON-ABS BIKES
DRAG SPECIALTIES 0215-0962 ABS ENC. NON-ABS STEEL STEEL $28.95 pr. ONE SET FOR ABS BIKES
DRAG SPECIALTIES 0215-0288 NON-ABS NON-ABS STEEL STEEL $22.95 set 4 BEARINGS FOR NON-ABS BIKES
V-TWIN 12-0996 ABS ENC. NON-ABS STEEL STEEL $35.88 pr. ONE SET FOR ABS BIKES
PIVOT WORKS PWRWS-HD06-000 NON-ABS NON-ABS STEEL STEEL $21.56 set 4 BEARINGS FOR NON-ABS BIKES
WORLDWIDE BEARINGS CB-6205 NON-ABS STEEL SILICON NITRIDE $85.95 ea. CERAMIC BEARING from BROCKSPERFORMANCE.COM
WORLDWIDE BEARINGS CB-9252 ABS ENC. STEEL SILICON NITRIDE $125.00 ea. CERAMIC BEARING from BROCKSPERFORMANCE.COM


































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